Top 10 Facts About Marijuana/Cannabis

So, we’ve compiled a little list here to expose some of the top 10 facts about weed. These are some of the points the media won’t tell you. The thing about marijuana facts is people always remember the media heightened propaganda facts, or the facts that have no scientific backing or the facts that have been long disproved yet continue to appear.

So let’s start!

10. Marijuana Prohibition

In 2011, use of marijuana by teenagers hit a 30-year peak, with one out of every 15 high school students reporting they smoke most days, and for the first time U.S. teens reported smoking more pot than cigarettes. But: teenagers don’t smoke any more pot in states where medical marijuana is legal than in ones where it’s not. Legalization advocates argue that the best way to reduce use by minors is to legalize and regulate pot.

9. Marijuana and cancer

A 2006 UCLA study concluded that even heavy marijuana use does not lead to lung cancer. “We hypothesized that there would be a positive association between marijuana use and lung cancer, and that the association would be more positive with heavier use,” said the study’s lead author. “What we found instead was no association at all, and even a suggestion of some protective effect.” This and other studies suggest that pot can actually inhibit the growth of cancerous tumors. Finally, what risks there are involve smoking, and there are other ways to consume marijuana.

8. Marijuana and the Gateway Theory

A report by the Institute of Medicine found “no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs.”

Read The Report here: Full Gateway Theory reading

7. Marijuana is a dangerous drug

Wrong. Marijuana is not a dangerous drug, two studies published here are just an example of many that have disproved this myth of weed. Study 1 Study 2

As with our previous post regarding alcohol vs cannabis these studies focus more on the destructive power of alcohol and tobacco. Marijuana is also far less dangerous than ‘harder’ drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

6. The marijuana numbers in the USA

A 2007 Government report estimated that 14.4 million Americans smoked pot during a one month testing period. One study in 2006 suggested that marijuana is the largest cash crop in the US at $35.8 Billion, but that number has recently been disputed, with a contrasting report putting it as low as $2.1 Billion. (Either way, it’s still a large, essentially unknowable number.) The largest producer of marijuana in the world is Mexico, followed by Paraguay. But who are the biggest users of the drug? The Good ol’ USA. According to a study in Time, 42% of Americans have tried it. Even President Obama has smoked it.

5. Where does marijuana come from?

Well in terms of growing it can come from anywhere, however the origin of the name isn’t really known.

Folklore has it that it is a hybrid of the names Maria and Juana, slang terms for a prostitute. Another theory is that it is derived from the word maraguanquo, which means “intoxicating plant.” While a variant of the word appeared as early as 1873, the plant was known mostly as cannabis. It wasn’t until the demonization of the drug in the 1930’s and 40’s (used to suppress minorities) that the word Marihuana was associated with “Reefer Madness.” Over the years, hundreds of nicknames have been coined, including grass, weed, dope, pot, and kush. What’s your favourite?

4. There is no cannabis overdose

There cannot possibly be a marijuana overdose, as a result the total deaths from marijuana remain at 0. Worldwide, tobacco use causes more than 5 million deaths per year, and current trends show that tobacco use will cause more than 8 million deaths annually by 2030.

An individual would need to smoke 800 joints to die, according to one report. The cause of death would be poisoning from carbon monoxide.

That sounds like a challenge…

3. Medical Marijuana States

In 1996, California became the first U.S. state to legally allow medical marijuana for patients with a valid doctor’s recommendation. We have progressed and this is the current list of medical marijuana states.

Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Hawaii
Iowa
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Montana
Nevada
New Jersey
New Mexico
Oregon
Rhode Island
Vermont
Washington

2. Legalisation in 2012

For the first time, two American states have legalized the recreational use and sale of marijuana. This is a step in the right direction for the universal legalisation of marijunana. Colorado and Washington are the states that have legalized and started taxing sales — a step that not even countries like the Netherlands, where wholesale selling and growing is illegal but small retail sales are tolerated in licensed “coffee shops,” have taken.

Washington’s law involves a licensing regime, to be handled by the state’s liquor control board, for growers and sellers. Initiative 502 bans sales to people under 21 and sets a 25% tax on both wholesale and retail sales, which will be used to fund drug prevention, schools and health insurance.

A long long way to go, but a big breakthrough for the legalisation of marijuana.

1. Using Hemp could save our planet

The biggest and most important fact about marijuana.

Uses of the hemp plant fibre itself are numerous. It can be made into rope, paper, clothing, canvas, eaten as a food, and its seeds can be used for fuel. It’s also good for the planet. A study by McGill University in Canada estimated that 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 million acres of industrial hemp would take care of all of our oil needs. In addition, unlike tobacco, which destroys the soil after every crop, planting cannabis actually improves it. It is legal in Uruguay, Peru, India, and even in Iran for it to be grown for food/fuel. Legalization of both hemp and marijuana would produce thousands of jobs, take care of world hunger, cut back on greenhouse gases, and help people cope with the pain of AIDs, glaucoma, and cancer. It turns out that getting “high” from it is just an added bonus.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s